Saturday, December 29, 2012

CFP: Pragmatism and Social Doubt in European Journal of Pragmatism

*European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy V, 2, 2013*


*Call for Papers*

*Pragmatism and the Social Dimensions of Doubt: Fresh Perspectives*


Guest editor: Mathias Girel (Ecole normale supérieure, Paris)

Debunking pathological doubts and sundry variants of skepticism has certainly been one of the most prominent features of Pragmatism since its inception in the early 1870s. Peirce's theory of inquiry, James's *Will to Believe*, and Dewey's *Quest for Certainty*, to mention only a few instances, to which Wittgenstein, as a non-standard pragmatist might be added, have offered several very different strategies to address this question. Extant scholarship has already devoted substantive accounts of this feature of pragmatism. Still, in addition to providing a rebuttal of the "paper-doubts" of the would-be skeptic, pragmatists have also been quite responsive to the *social* dimensions of doubt. As regards the
causes: Peirce, when he claims that we cannot doubt at will, mentions repeatedly that one of the strongest factors of doubt is the doubt of other competent inquirers. As regards the consequences: doubt has consequences on epistemic trust, on the way we discuss truths, either about the sciences or about the "construction of good". Readers of Dewey's *Quest* *for Certainty*and of some of his most important political writings can easily see how practical uncertainty can degenerate into a practical and political skepticism, preventing the emergence of publics.

This social aspect of the question has received less attention than the general pragmatist strategy towards skepticism, for which we already have important papers and monographs. Fundamental contributions --- whether conceptual or historical --- on the social dimensions of doubt in a pragmatist perspective would greatly benefit extant scholarship.

Several contexts have made this inquiry more urgent still. Firstly, doubt about the sciences --- about scientific certainty, scientific consensus and scientific normativity --- has been increasingly enrolled within several strategies and used to promote public controversies: can pragmatism offer, for example, an account of reasonable doubt in the sciences that would dismiss pathological doubts about the sciences, in the same way as the classical pragmatists have dismissed cartesian unreasonable doubts?
Secondly, the emergence of a new kind of pragmatism, inspired by Sellars and focusing on the social articulation of the space of reasons, had prompted new developments and sometimes a reconstruction of the main notions of classical epistemology : what are the main insights of linguistic pragmatism about this central notion? Thirdly, the social sciences have made extensive use of pragmatist resources in the past decades and it is time to see if they can in return cast some light on one of the core notions of pragmatism.

This issue of the *European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy* wants to investigate the perspectives that pragmatisms, old and new, open up on the social articulation of doubt. We will welcome any contribution on this topic that will (i) clarify classic or neo pragmatists accounts of doubt in its social setting, or (ii) use pragmatist insights in other disciplines --- sociology, anthropology, political science, HPS --- to explore the social dimensions of doubt, or (iii) compare pragmatist views with authors and perspectives belonging to other philosophical streams, or (iv) propose new theories inspired by pragmatism. Contributions offering new insights on the theory of inquiry, or providing a new reading of classical pragmatism, will be considered of central interest.

Papers should be sent to mathias.girel@ens.fr before June, 30, 2013. Papers should not exceed 12.000 words and must include an abstract of 200-400 words and a list of works cited. Papers will be selected on the basis of a process of blind review. Acceptance of papers will be determined before August, 10, 2013. Papers will be published in December 2013.

Donate to the Peirce Foundation

Giving is easy, and, as charitable organization, gifts to the Peirce Foundation are tax deductible for American citizens. Simply link to the Peirce Foundation website at:


Concerning the upcoming Charles S. Peirce International Centennial Congress held at July 16-19, 2014 at the University of Massachusetts Lowell...

A donor is providing a total of $1000 as match for anyone who might like to contribute with that in mind. If you contribute $50, the donor will match with $50, and do so for others until the $1000 is exhausted. That way your gift will go twice as far.

You also have an opportunity to sponsor a graduate student to the conference, with the asking gift of $300. This will assist students with any expenses associated with the conference travel and stay. It is important that we support the next generation of Peirce scholars, and this conference will an opportunity to help with that effort.

Friday, December 28, 2012

William James Society Session at the Eastern APA

The William James Society will be holding its annual session at the Eastern
APA in Atlanta, the night of December 29th from 7-10 pm.

APA - Eastern Division Meeting
Dec. 27-30, 2012
Atlanta, GA

William James Society Annual Meeting
Dec. 29, 2012; 7:00 - 10:00 pm

* Presidential Address: D. Micah Hester (UAMS)

* Invited Panel: Insights from "The Will to Believe"
Panelists: Scott Aikin (Vanderbilt), Jeff Kasser (Colorado State)
Respondent: Michael Slater (Georgetown)

* Business Meeting

CFP: AAPT Workshop on Teaching and Learning in Philosophy

Call For Proposals

Proposals for interactive workshops, panels, and presentations related to teaching and learning in Philosophy are welcome.

American Association of Philosophy Teachers
Workshop on Teaching and Learning in Philosophy
Saturday, June 1, 2013
Morehouse College
Atlanta, GA

Submission Guidelines:
1-2 page, single-space description of the aim of the session. Send to Nathan Nobis (Morehouse College), nathan.nobis@gmail.com , and Galen Foresman (North Carolina A&T State University), gaforesm@ncat.edu

Meritorious proposals will contain evidence-based content (e.g. relevant learning theory, data regarding student experience) and a clear description of the interactive nature of the session. No identifying information should appear on the proposal.

Workshop Format:

The workshop is designed to provide an opportunity for speakers to receive constructive feedback from interested colleagues, and for other participants to become acquainted with new work in the field. We anticipate close discussion among devoted philosophy teachers and scholars of teaching and learning. There is no registration fee. Contact Nathan Nobis at Nathan.nobis@gmail.com or 404-825-1740 for more information or with questions.

American Association of Philosophy Teachers: http://philosophyteachers.org/
Morehouse College: http://morehouse.edu

Deadline for Receipt of Proposals:
February 15, 2011

This call for proposals is available here in PDF:

SAAP Reception at the Eastern APA TONIGHT

The annual SAAP reception at the APA will be held tomorrow night, December 28th, at 9 pm in room 1110 at the Marriott Marquis, Atlanta. Join us!

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

CFP: Ancient and Analytic Philosophy

Ancient philosophy and analytic philosophy

Conference organised by Catherine Rowett, Tom Sorell and Alberto Vanzo, to be held in St Anne's College, Oxford, on 25-27 October 2013

For the past forty years, most research on ancient philosophy in the
English-speaking world has been shaped by the methods and style of
analytic philosophy. This has sharpened our understanding of key
doctrines, highlighted their philosophical relevance, and made it
possible for ancient views to bear on current debates. This alliance
of analytic philosophy and ancient philosophy also raises pressing
methodological questions. To what extent are we allowed to supplement
the claims of ancient philosophers with premises and concepts that the
authors involved would not recognize? How can our understanding of the
arguments of ancient philosophers profit from the study of
non-argumentative aspects of their texts, like the use of myths or the
dialogic form? How should we deal wih texts whose standards of
argument that are markedly different from our own, or which seek to
promote specific forms of life, rather than establishing a specific
body of truths?

Invited speakers: Mosley Brown (Oxford), Walter Cavini (Bologna), Gail
Fine (Cornell/Oxford), Terence Irwin (Oxford), Kathryn Morgan (UCLA),
Vasilis Politis (Dublin), Christopher Rowe (Durham).

Two slots are available for presentations of 45 minutes from
early-career scholars, followed by 30 minutes of discussion. We aim
to cover some of the travel and accommodation costs.

Please submit full papers (max. 15,000 words) to Alberto Vanzo
(alberto.vanzo@email.it) by Monday 3 June 2013.

Friday, December 21, 2012

CFP: Pragmatism and the Social Dimensions of Doubt: Fresh Perspectives

Call for Papers

Pragmatism and the Social Dimensions of Doubt: Fresh Perspectives
Guest editor: Mathias Girel (Ecole normale supérieure, Paris)

Debunking pathological doubts and sundry variants of skepticism has certainly been one of the most prominent features of Pragmatism since its inception in the early 1870s. Peirce's theory of inquiry, James's Will to Believe, and Dewey's Quest for Certainty, to mention only a few instances, to which Wittgenstein, as a non-standard pragmatist might be added, have offered several very different strategies to address this question. Extant scholarship has already devoted substantive accounts of this feature of pragmatism. Still, in addition to providing a rebuttal of the "paper-doubts" of the would-be skeptic, pragmatists have also been quite responsive to the socialdimensions of doubt. As regards the causes: Peirce, when he claims that we cannot doubt at will, mentions repeatedly that one of the strongest factors of doubt is the doubt of other competent inquirers. As regards the consequences: doubt has consequences on epistemic trust, on the way we discuss truths, either about the sciences or about the "construction of good". Readers of Dewey's Quest for Certainty and of some of his most important political writings can easily see how practical uncertainty can degenerate into a practical and political skepticism, preventing the emergence of publics.

This social aspect of the question has received less attention than the general pragmatist strategy towards skepticism, for which we already have important papers and monographs. Fundamental contributions --- whether conceptual or historical --- on the social dimensions of doubt in a pragmatist perspective would greatly benefit extant scholarship.

Several contexts have made this inquiry more urgent still. Firstly, doubt about the sciences --- about scientific certainty, scientific consensus and scientific normativity --- has been increasingly enrolled within several strategies and used to promote public controversies: can pragmatism offer, for example, an account of reasonable doubt in the sciences that would dismiss pathological doubts about the sciences, in the same way as the classical pragmatists have dismissed cartesian unreasonable doubts? Secondly, the emergence of a new kind of pragmatism, inspired by Sellars and focusing on the social articulation of the space of reasons, had prompted new developments and sometimes a reconstruction of the main notions of classical epistemology : what are the main insights of linguistic pragmatism about this central notion? Thirdly, the social sciences have made extensive use of pragmatist resources in the past decades and it is time to see if they can in return cast some light on one of the core notions of pragmatism.

This issue of the European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy wants to investigate the perspectives that pragmatisms, old and new, open up on the social articulation of doubt. We will welcome any contribution on this topic that will (i) clarify classic or neo pragmatists accounts of doubt in its social setting, or (ii) use pragmatist insights in other disciplines --- sociology, anthropology, political science, HPS --- to explore the social dimensions of doubt, or (iii) compare pragmatist views with authors and perspectives belonging to other philosophical streams, or (iv) propose new theories inspired by pragmatism. Contributions offering new insights on the theory of inquiry, or providing a new reading of classical pragmatism, will be considered of central interest.

Papers should be sent to mathias.girel@ens.fr before June, 30, 2013. Papers should not exceed 12.000 words and must include an abstract of 200-400 words and a list of works cited. Papers will be selected on the basis of a process of blind review. Acceptance of papers will be determined before August, 10, 2013. Papers will be published in December 2013.

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

The Human Eros: Eco-Ontology and the Aesthetics of Existence


The lastest book from a mentor, and whose philosophy I am an intellectual heir. Tom aims towards culture and civilization, whereas I start from that ground and go towards culture and personal ethics. He tends to think at the level of ecosystems, civilizations, and the world, whereas I think upon personal responsibility, redemption, tragic moral consciousness, etc.

Inland Northwest Pragmatist Network


INLAND NORTHWEST PRAGMATIST NETWORK
Gonzaga University
Spokane, Washington

* January 26 (Saturday), 2013*
All sessions meet in College Hall, Room 101
-no fee, no registration, open to the public

10:30am-12pm: “Pragmatism & Obama”
–a Discussion led by Jon Isacoff (Political Science, Gonzaga)

12:15-1:30pm: LUNCH

1:45-3:15pm: “What Does Naturalism Mean By ‘Practical’?”
-Kevin Decker (Philosophy, Eastern Washington)

3:15-3:30pm: BREAK

3:45-5:15pm:
KEY TEXT DISCUSSION of
John Dewey’s new book: Unmodern Philosophy and Modern Philosophy

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

CFP: New Orleans Workshop on Agency and Responsibility

This is a call for abstracts for the second biennial New Orleans Workshop on Agency and Responsibility (NOWAR), to be held in New Orleans, LA at the Intercontinental Hotel on November 7-9, 2013. Abstracts are welcome on any topic having to do with agency and/or responsibility. Perspectives beyond just those from moral philosophy (e.g., psychology, legal theory, neuroscience, economics, metaphysics, and more) are welcome. (To see more about the workshop’s general aims and other details, follow this link: http://murphy.tulane.edu/events/center-conferences-symposia/1888.php.) 

Abstracts should be no more than 3 double-spaced pages and are due no later than March 1, 2013. They do NOT need to be prepared for blind review. Please send abstracts by e-mail to David Shoemaker: dshoemak@tulane.edu. A program committee will evaluate submissions and make decisions by early May. The authors of all accepted abstracts will be expected to provide drafts of their essays for distribution to NOWAR attendees four weeks prior to the workshop, present their ideas at the workshop, and then commit the final versions of their essays (subject to external review) to the second volume of Oxford Studies on Agency and Responsibility (which is expected to be published in early 2015). Those who presented at the first NOWAR are ineligible to present at the second. 


Keynote Speakers, 2013
John Martin Fischer, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, University of California, Riverside
Susan Wolf, Edna J. Koury Professor of Philosophy, University of North Carolina

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

CONF: SAAP at the Eastern APA

FRIDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 28th****

GIV - 7. Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy****

2:00 - 5:00 p.m.****
Topic: Pragmatist Approaches to Culture and Justice****
Chair: Eric Thomas Weber (University of Mississippi)****

Speakers: Susan Dieleman (Ryerson University)****
"Epistemic Justice as a Larger Loyalty"****

Katherine Logan (University of Oregon)****
"Joan Williams, Feminist Pragmatism, and 'Work-Family Conflict"****

Gregory Pappas (Texas A & M University)****
"Towards a Pragmatist's Inquiry about Injustice"****

Eric Thomas Weber (University of Mississippi)****
"A Culture of Justice: On Rawls, Dewey, and Rorty"****



SATURDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 29th****
GIX - 7. Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy****

1:30 - 4:30 p.m.****
Topic: Mead, Royce, and Dewey: Early Encounters with Evolution****
Chair: Mike Brady (Southern Illinois University - Carbondale)****

Speakers: William Baird (Southern Illinois University - Carbondale)****
"The Apple Falls Far from the Tree: Josiah Royce’s Divergence from Joseph
LeConte’s Evolutionary Totalism"****

Mike Brady (Southern Illinois University - Carbondale)****
"John Dewey and Eugenics"****

Trevor Pearce (University of Wisconsin - Madison)****
"George Herbert Mead’s Debt to Biology: Evolution and Philosophy in the
1880s"

Monday, December 3, 2012

CONF: Metaphysics of Culture and Joseph Margolis


Conference:

The Metaphysics of Culture
- The Philosophy of Joseph Margolis

Helsinki, Finland
20-21 May 2013


Joseph Margolis’ philosophical career stretches over several decades. A
major figure of contemporary pragmatism, he is especially known for his
systematic defense of relativism and for emphasizing the historical
character of human thinking and inquiry.

This conference is devoted to the different aspects of Margolis’ vast
philosophical work and its contemporary relevance. Its keynote speakers are
Joseph Margolis and Christopher Hookway.

The event is organized by the Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, The
Philosophical Society of Finland, The Finnish Society for Aesthetics and
the Nordic Pragmatism Network.

For more information and the full call for papers, please see the
conference webpage at:


Please feel free to forward this announcement to mailing lists and possibly
interested colleagues.

CFP: Public Philosophy in Essays in Philosophy


Call for Papers
Essays in Philosophy
Volume 15, Number 1
Issue date: January 2014
 
Journal issue topic: Public Philosophy
 
Submission deadline: October 31, 2013
Editor: Jack Russell Weinstein (University of North Dakota)
Public philosophy is a vibrant sub-discipline with a long history stemming from Socrates onward. In the last few decades it has become an industry in the form of multiple book series on the connections between philosophy and popular culture, a force on the internet with dozens of philosophy-oriented blogs, and a beacon of hope for those who wish to educate often uncritical democratic populaces. But little work has been done on the nature and role of public philosophy in and of itself, and little attention has been placed on its methods as distinct from traditional teaching. This issue of Essay in Philosophy aims to be the first single-volume dedicated to the comprehensive examination of the philosophy underpinning public philosophy.

Public philosophy in this context refers to doing philosophy with general audiences in a non-academic setting. And while it is often said to play a role in democratic education, public philosophy is its own enterprise. It is philosophy outside the classroom, a voluntary endeavor without course-credit, assignments, or even a clear purpose. Submissions to the journal will ask about its nature, purpose, role, and assumptions.
Some sample topics include:
–The purpose of public philosophy.
– The history of public philosophy.
– The use of argument in public philosophy.
– The role of the “teacher” or facilitator in public philosophy events.
– Connections between public philosophy and democracy.
– Public philosophy and the internet.
– Short-form philosophy and its effectiveness.
– Public philosophy as entertainment.
– The language of public philosophy.
– Social networks as a tool for public philosophy.
– The nature and role of the “amateur” philosopher.
– Public philosophy and its relationship to the university.
– Public philosophy and professional philosophy.
– Public philosophy and diverse populations.
– Is public philosophy “research” in the sense required for tenure by most institutions?
The volume also welcomes reviews of public philosophy texts investigating their success or failure as public philosophy (as opposed to evaluating them as philosophical argument). Such texts include but are not limited to: Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar, Socrates Café, Sophie’s World, Wittgenstein’s Poker, and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance.
All submissions should be sent to the general editor via email: boersema@pacificu.edu.
Submission guidelines are available here: http://commons.pacificu.edu/eip/styleguide.html

Saturday, December 1, 2012

CFP: 9th International Whitehead Conference


Colleagues, on behalf of the International Process Network and the organizing committee of the 9th International Whitehead Conference: "Society and Process: From Theory to Practice," which will be taking place in Krakow, Poland, from September 9-12, 2013, we would like to cordially invite you to submit a paper for the conference and/or possibly chair a section of the conference. The call for abstracts on most any topic related to process philosophy will be going out shortly.

For information about the conference, please visit: http://iwc9-poland.com. Also feel free to contact the main organizer, especially if you would like to chair a section: Bogdan Ogrodnik at: bogrod@interia.pl. We look forward to seeing you at what promises to be a superb event.

Very Best Wishes,

Adam Scarfe, Ph.D., M.Ed.,
Executive Director,
International Process Network

Academic Address:
Department of Philosophy,
University of Winnipeg,
515 Portage Avenue,
Canada R3B 2E9
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