Pragmatist Repository


The following is a select, annotated bibliography of writings in pragmatism. It will be progressively updated and annotated. In its current form, it reflects my research as of four years ago.


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Thomas Alexander. “The Context of Community,” Southwest Philosophical Studies 14 (Spring 1992): 16-25.

Thomas Alexander. "Dewey and the Metaphysical Imagination," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXVIII, No. 2 (Spring 1992): 203-215.

Thomas Alexander. “Dewey’s Denotative-Empirical Method: A Thread through the Labyrinth,” Journal of Speculative Philosophy, Vol. 18, No. 3 (2004).

Thomas Alexander. "Dewey's Metaphysics and the Principle of Continuity," Southwest Philosophical Studies, Vol. XI, No. 2 (1986): 39-51.

Thomas Alexander. “Educating the Democratic Heart: Pluralism, Traditions and the Humanities,” in The New Scholarship on John Dewey. ed. Jim Garrison.  Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995.

Thomas Alexander. “John Dewey and the Moral Imagination: Beyond Putnam and Rorty Towards a Postmodern Ethics," Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXIX, No. 3 (1993): 369-400.

Thomas Alexander. “John Dewey and the Roots of Democratic Imagination,” in Recovering Pragmatism’s Voice: The Classical Tradition, Rorty, and the Philosophy of Communication, eds. Lenore Langsdorf and Andrew R. Smith. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1995.

Thomas Alexander. The Horizons of Feeling: John Dewey's Theory of Art, Experience, and Nature. Albany, SUNY Press, 1987.

Thomas Alexander. "Pragmatic Imagination," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXVI, No. 3 (Summer 1990): ?.

Thomas Alexander. "Richard Rorty and Dewey's Metaphysics of Existence," Southwest Philosophical Studies, Vol. V (1980): 24-35.

Richard Bernstein. John Dewey. New York: Washington Square Press, 1966.
            Dewey was optimistic.[i]

Raymond D. Boisvert. John Dewey: Rethinking our Time. Albany, State University of New York Press, 1998.

Raymond Boisvert. "The Nemesis of Necessity: Tragedy's Challenge to Deweyan Pragmatism," in Dewey Reconfigured. Albany: SUNY Press, 1999.
            Notes Dewey’s lack of sensitivity to human limitation.[ii]

Randolph Boume. "Twilight of Idols" (1917), in The War and the Intellectuals: Col- lected Essays, 1915-1919, ed. Carl Resek. New York: Harper, 1964. pp. 60-61.
            Dewey sacrifices vision at the expense of means/technique.[iii]

Robert B. Brandom, “The Pragmatist Enlightenment (and its Problematic Semantics),” European Journal of Philosophy 12.1 (2004): ?-?.

James Campbell. Understanding John Dewey: Nature and Cooperative Intelligence. ?: Open Court, 1995.
            Addresses many Dewey critiques, including social engineering.

William R. Caspary. "'One and the Same Method': John Dewey's Thesis of Unity of Method in Ethics and Science," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXXIX, No. 3 (Summer 2003): 445-468.
            Defense of Dewey on scientific method in ethics, somewhat cognitivist.

William R. Caspary. “Dewey and Sartre on Ethical Decisions: Dramatic Rehearsal Versus Radical Choice,” Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. 42, No. 3 (2006): 367-393.

William R. Caspary, Dewey on Democracy. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2000.
            Addresses Dewey on social engineering.[iv]

Craig Cunningham. “Dewey’s Metaphysics and the Self,” in The New Scholarship on John Dewey. ed. Jim Garrison.  Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995.

Gerard Deledalle. L'idee d'experience dans la philosophie de John Dewey. Paris: Presses universitaires de france, 1967.
            Synoptic view of the development of Dewey’s philosophy.

Gérard Deledalle. Histoire de la philosophie americaine. Paris: Presses universitaires de france, 1954.
            Introduction to American philosophy.

Patrick J. Deneen. Democratic Faith. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2005.
            Deweyan inquiry encourages self-assertion over humility.[v]

John Dewey. “From Absolutism to Experimentalism,” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1883-1953, The Later Works Vol. 5. ?: ?,?.
            Autobiography.

John Dewey. Art as Experience, in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1883-1953, The Later Works, Vol. 10.

John Dewey. “The Chaos in Moral Training,” in Popular Science Monthly (August 1894).
            Notes fragmentation of customary moral education.

John Dewey. "Comment on Recent Criticisms of Some Points in Moral and Logical Theory," in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1883-1953, The Later Works of John Dewey, 1925-1953, Vol. 17. ?: ?, ?.
            Explains evolution of desire to norm; response to Morton G. White.

John Dewey. “’Contrary to Human Nature,’” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1883-1953, The Later Works of John Dewey, 1925-1953, Vol. 14. ?: ?, ?.

John Dewey. Essays in Experimental Logic. ?: ?, ?.

John Dewey. The Essential Dewey Vols. I&II, eds. Larry Hickman, Thomas Alexander. Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1998.

John Dewey and James Tufts. Ethics, in The Collected Works of John Dewey 19882-1953, The Later Works 1925-1953, Vol. 7, Second Edition. Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 2008.

John Dewey. "Events and the Future," The Later Works of John Dewey, 1925-1953. Vol. 2. Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University, ?.

John Dewey. "The Evolutionary Method as Applied to Morality," The Philosophical Review, Vol. 11, No. 2 (March 1902): 108-124.

John Dewey. "The Evolutionary Method as Applied to Morality: II. Its Significance for Conduct," The Philosophical Review, Vol. 11, No. 4 (July 1902): 353-371.

John Dewey. “Experience, Knowledge, and Value: A Rejoinder,” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 19882-1953, The Later Works 1925-1953, Vol. 14. ?: ?, ?.

John Dewey. Experience and Nature, in The Collected Works of John Dewey 19882-1953, The Later Works 1925-1953,  Vol. 1. ?: ?, ?.

John Dewey. “Further as to Valuation as to Judgment,” in The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 40, No. 20 (September 1943): 543-552.
            sequel to “Valuation and Immediate Quality.”

John Dewey. “The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy”.

John Dewey. “Human Nature,” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 19882-1953, The Later Works 1925-1953, Vol. 6. Carbondale and Edwardsville, Southern Illinois University Press,.

John Dewey. Human Nature and Conduct, in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1882-1953, The Middle Works, 1898-1924, Vol. 14. Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 1988.

John Dewey. The Moral Writings of John Dewey, ed. James Gouinlock. Buffalo: Prometheus Books, 1994.  Revised edition of the Macmillan, 1976 edition.

John Dewey. "The Pragmatic Acquiescence," in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1882-1953, The Later Works 1925-1953, Vol. 3. ? : ?, ?.
            Response to Lewis Mumford’s The Golden Day

John Dewey.   "Pragmatic America," in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1882-1953, The Middle Works 1898-1924, Vol. 13. ?: ?, ?. pp. 306-310
            Response to Russell questioning Deweyan value, individual and culture, and[vi]
            overconfident of prospects of self-sacrifice for social good

John Dewey.  “The Psychological Method in Ethics,” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1882-1953, The Middle Works 1898-1924, Vol. 3. ?:?, ?. pp. 59-61.

John Dewey. “A Naturalistic Theory of Sense Perception,” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1882-1953, The Later Works 1925-1953, Vol. 2. ?:?,?.

John Dewey. “Science and Society,” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 19882-1953, The Later Works 1925-1953, Vol. 6. ? : ? , ?.

John Dewey. "Self-Realization as a Moral Ideal"

John Dewey. Studies in Logical Theory

John Dewey. “Some Questions about Value,” The Collected Works of John Dewey, 1882-1953, Vol. 15: 1942-1948.  Carbondale and Edwardsville, Southern Illinois Unviersity Press, ?.

John Dewey, “The Theory of Emotion,” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1882-1953, The Early Works, Vol. 4 ().

John Dewey. The Theory of the Moral Life, ed. Victor Kestenbaum (Irvington Pub., 1992).

John Dewey. “The Theory of Valuation,” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1882-1953, The Later Works 1925-1953, Vol. 13. Carbondale and Edwardsville, Southern Illinois University Press,.

John Dewey. “Valuation and Experimental Knowledge,” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1882-1953, The Middle Works Vol. 13. ? : ?, ?.,  3-28.

John Dewey. “Value Judgments and Immediate Quality,” in The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 40, No. 12 (June 1943): 309-317 (or LW 15:63-72).

John Dewey. “The Vanishing Subject in James,” in The Collected Works of John Dewey 1882-1953, The Later Works, 1925-1953, Vol. 14. ? : ?, ?.,  155-167

John Patrick Diggins. The Promise of Pragmatism: Modernism and the Crisis of Knowledge and Authority. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1994.
            Questions ability of Deweyan inquiry to withdraw from culture in order to critique.[vii]
            Such inquiry encourages self-assertion over humility.[viii]

S. Morris Eames. “The Cognitive and Non-Congitive in Dewey’s Theory of Valuation,” Journal of Philosophy Vol. 58, No. 7 (March 20, 1961): 179-195.

S. Morris Eames. Experience and Value: Essays on John Dewey and Pragmatic Naturalism, eds. Elizabeth Eames and Richard Field. Carbondale and Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press, 2003.

S. Morris Eames. "Valuing, Obligation, and Evaluation," Philosophy and Phenomenological Research Vol. 24, No. 3 (March 1964): 318-328.

James Eddie. William James and Phenomenology

Abraham Edel. Ethical Theory & Social Change: the Evolution of John Dewey's Ethics, 1908-1932. ?: Transaction Pub., 2001.
            Philosophical and historical comparison of  Dewey’s ’08 and ’32 Ethics.

Michael Eldridge. Transforming Experience: John Dewey’s Cultural Instrumentalism. Nashville: Vanderbuilt University Press, 1998.
            Addresses Dewey critique of social engineering.[ix]

Christopher J. Eisele. "John Dewey and the Immigrants," History of Education Quarterly Vol. 15, No. 1 (Spring 1975): 67-85.
            Dewey allows social control for bourgeois pliancy.[x]

Matthew Festenstein. Pragmatism and Political Theory: From Dewey to Rorty. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997.
            Addresses Dewey on social engineering.[xi]

Steven Fesmire. "The Art of Moral Imagination," in Dewey Reconfigured. Albany: SUNY Press, 1999.

Steven Fesmire. "Dramatic Rehearsal and the Moral Artist" in Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society

Steven Fesmire. Dramatic Rehearsal and the Moral Artist: A Deweyan Theory of Moral Understanding. Dissertation, Philosophy Dept., Southern Illinois University, advisor Thomas Alexander.

Steven Fesmire. John Dewey and the Moral Imagination (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003).

Steven Fesmire. "Morality as Art: Dewey, Metaphor, and Moral Imagination," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXXV, No. 3 (Summer 1999): 527-550.

Charles Frankel. "John Dewey's Social Philosophy," in New Studies in the Philosophy of John Dewey, ed. Steven M Cahn. Hanover, MA: The University Press of New England, 1977.
            Various critiques of Dewey.[xii]

Andrew Garnar. “Pragmatism and Wickedness,” presentation at the Society for the Advancement of American Pragmatism Annual Conference, March 2009.
            Call for pragmatism to address inherent potential for wickedness.

Jim Garrison. The New Scholarship on Dewey. Dordrecht: Kluwer, 1995.

Jim Garrison. "John Dewey, Jacques Derrida, and the Metaphysics of Presence," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXXV, No. 2 (Spring 1999): 346-372.

William Gavin. "How Things Go Wrong in Our Experience: John Dewey vs. Franz Kafka vs. William Carlos Williams," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXXV, No. 1 (Winter 1999): 39-68.

James Good. A Search for Unity in Diversity: The Permanent Hegelian Deposit in The Philosophy of John Dewey. ?: Lexington Books, 2006.
            Historic criticisms of Dewey concerning critical distance reduce to three types.[xiii]

James Good. “Dewey’s ‘Permanent Hegelian Deposit’: A Reply to Hickman and Alexander,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society Vol. 44, No. 4 (2008): 577-602.

James Good. “Rereading Dewey’s “Permanent Hegelian Deposit,” in John Dewey’s Philosophy of Spirit with the 1897 Lecture on Hegel, eds. James Good and John Shook. New York: Fordham, July 15, 2010.

James Gouinlock. "Dewey and Contemporary Moral Philosophy" in Philosophy and the Reconstruction of Culture: Pragmatic Essays after Dewey, edited by John J. Stuhr. Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 1993. pp. 79-96.

James Gouinlock. "Dewey, John” in Encyclopedia of Ethics, edited by Lawrence C. Becker. New York and London: Garland Publishing Inc., 1992. pp. 259-262.

James Gouinlock. "Dewey's Ethical Theory in Historical Context" in Ethics in the History of Western Philosophy, edited by Robert J. Cavalier, James Gouinlock and James P. Sterba. London: Macmillan; New York: St. Martin's, 1989.

James Gouinlock. "Dewey's Theory of Moral Deliberation," Ethics Vol. 88, No. 3 (April 1978): 218-228. Reprinted in John Dewey: Critical Assessments, edited by J. E. Tiles. New York: Routlege, Chapman and Hall, 1993.
            Historic response to White and Stevenson, per is/ought problem and emotivism.[xiv]

James Gouinlock. "Dewey, Virtue, and Moral Pluralism" in American Philosophy: Its Roots and Edges, edited by Burch and Saatkamp. Texas A&M University Press, 1996.

James Gouinlock. Eros and the Good. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 2004.
            Dewey needs power, toil, negative, limit, conflict in metaphysics;  respect custom.

James Gouinlock. John Dewey's Philosophy of Value. New York: Humanities Press, 1972.

James Gouinlock. "Justice, Virtue, and Collective Deliberation: The Heritage of Aristotle and Dewey" in On Justice: Plato's and Aristotle's Conception of Justice in Relation to Modern and Contemporary Theories of Justice, edited by K. Boudouris. Athens: Greek Philosophical Society, 1989. pp. 195-201.

James Gouinlock. The Moral Writings of John Dewey. Buffalo: Macmillan, 1976.

James Gouinlock. "Philosophy and Moral Values: The Pragmatic Analysis" in Pragmatism: Its Sources and Prospects, edited by Robert J. Mulvaney and Philip M. Zeltner. Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 1981. pp. 97-119.

Colin Greer. The Great School Legend: A Revisionist Interpretation of American Public Education. New York: Basic Books, 1972.
            Deweyan thought allows for social control for bourgeois pliancy.[xv]

Martin Heidegger, Basic Writings, ed.

Martin Heidegger, Being and Time

Martin Heidegger, Identity and Difference, ed.

Martin Heidegger, Pathmarks, ed.

Martin Heidegger, Poetry, Language, Thought, ed.

Larry Hickman. Reading Dewey: Interpretations for a Postmodern Generation. Indiana UP, 1998.

Larry Hickman. Pragmatism as Post-Modernism: Lessons from John Dewey. New York: Fordham University Press, ?.
            Last chapter figures Deweyan habits as more Peircean.

Larry Hickman. Philosophical Tools for a Technological Culture. Bloomington, IN: Indiana UP, 2001.

Larry Hickman. John Dewey's Pragmatic Technology. Bloomington, IN: Indiana UP, 1992.
            Addresses critique of Dewey on social engineering.

Larry Hickman. "Contextualizing Knowledge: A Reply to 'Dewey and the Theory of Knowledge,'" Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXVI, No. 4 (Fall 1990): ?.

Larry Hickman. “Why Peirce Didn’t Like Dewey’s Logic,” Southwest Philosophy Review  Vol. III (1986): 178-189.

Richard Hofstadter. Intellectualism in American Life. New York: Knopf, 1962.
            Dewey as shill for corporate liberalism.[xvi]

Sidney Hook. “Pragmatism and the Tragic Sense of Life” in Contemporary American Philosophy, ed. J.E. Smith. London & New York: George Allen & Unwin and Humanities Press, 1970. pp. 170-193.

Sidney Hook. Pragmatism and the Tragic Sense of Life. New York: Basic Books, 1974.
            Claims Dewey is tragic in Hegel’s sense, “tragedy is moral conflict.”[xvii]      

D.T. Howard. "The Pragmatic Method," The Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods, Vol. 15, No. 6 (March 14, 1918): 149-157.
            Critique: mind and spirit poorly handled by biologic, evolutionary method.

Edmund Husserl. Cartesian Meditations

Edmund Husserl. Crisis of the European Sciences

T.H. Huxley. “Evolution and Ethics and Prolegomena” (1892)
            Claims evolution is contrary to ethics: constrained chaos vs. self-imposed order.

William James. Essays on Faith and Morals, ed. Ralph Barton Perry. Cleveland: Meredian Books, 1962.

Robert Jacques. “The Tragic World of John Dewey,” The Journal of Value Inquiry, Vol. 25, No. 3 (July 1991): 249-261.

William James, A Pluralistic Universe

William James, Pragmatism

William James, Principles of Psychology

William James, The Will to Believe and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy

James Scott Johnston. "Dewey's Critique of Kant," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XLII, No. 4 (Fall 2006): 518-551.

Immanuel Kant. Critique of Practical Reason, trans. Werner Pluhar. Indianapolis, Hackett, 2002.

Immanuel Kant. Critique of Pure Reason, trans. Norman Kemp Smith. New York, Palgrave MacMillan, 2003.

Immanuel Kant. Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, trans. Arnulf Zweig, ed. Thomas E. Hill and Arnulf Zweig. Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2002.

Michael Katz. Class, Bureaucracy and Schools: The Illusion of Educational Change in America. New York: Praeger, 1971.
            Deweyan thought allows for social control for bourgeois pliancy.[xviii]

Victor Kestenbaum. The Grace and the Severity of the Ideal: John Dewey and the Transcendent. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2002.

Victor Kestenbaum. The Phenomenological Sense of John Dewey. Atlantic Highlands: Humanities Press, 1977.

Victor Kestenbaum. "Phenomenology and Dewey's Empiricism: A Response to Leroy Troutner," Educational Theory Vol. 22, No. 1 (Winter 1972): 99-108.

Victor Kestenbaum. “A Thing of Moods and Tenses – Experience in John Dewey”, in Phenomenology, Dialogues and Bridges.

Victor Kestenbaum. "The Undeclared Self," in Dewey Reconfigured. Albany: SUNY Press, 1999.

Soren Kierkegaard. Fear and Trembling

Soren Kierkegaard. The Present Age

Soren Kierkegaard. Repetition

Soren Kierkegaard. Sickness unto Death

John Lachs. “Stoic Pragmatism,” Journal of Speculative Philosophy Vol. 19, No. 2 (2005): 95-106.
            Stoicism allows acceptance of limits and pragmatism’s urge to change.

Christopher Lasch, The New Radicalism in America, 1889-1963: The Intellectual as a Social Type. New York: Knopf, 1965.
            Dewey as shill for corporate liberalism.[xix]
            Questions ability of Deweyan inquiry to withdraw from culture to critque.[xx]

Christopher Lasch. The True and Only Heaven: Progress and Its Critics. New York: Norton, 1991
            Questions ability of Deweyan inquiry to withdraw from culture to critque.[xxi]

Todd Lekan. Making Morality: Pragmatist Reconstruction in Moral Theory (?: Vanderbuilt University Press, 2003)

Brian Lloyd. Left Out: Pragmatism, Exceptionalism, and the Poverty of American Marxism, 1890-1922. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.
            Deweyan thought allows for social control for bourgeous pliancy of masses.[xxii]

Eric MacGilvray, "Experience as Experiment: Some Consequences of Pragmatism for Democratic Theory," American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 43, No. 2 (April 1999): 542-565.
            Defense of Dewey on use of science in morality.

Eric MacGilvray. "Five Myths about Pragmatism, Or, against a Second Pragmatic Acquiescence," Political Theory, Vol. 28, No. 4 (Aug 2000): 480-508.
            Pragmatic ethics and politics does not acquiesce to prevailing norms.

Alasdair MacIntyre. After Virtue

Peter Manicas. “Nature and Culture,” Proceedings of the American Philosophical Association, Vol. 66, No. 3 (Nov 1992): 59-76.
            Reconsidering naturalism in contemporary philosophy of social sciences.

Joseph Margolis. Life Without Principles: Reconciling Theory and Practice. ?: Wiley-Blackwell, 1996.

Joseph Margolis. Pragmatism without Foundations: Reconciling Realism and Relativism. Basil Blackwell, 1986.

Joseph Margolis. Reinventing Pragmatism: American Philosophy at the End of the Twentieth Century. Ithaca, NY: Cornell UP, 2002.

Louis Menand. The Metaphysical Club. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2001.
                       
John Stewart Mill. Utilitarianism

John Stewart Mill. On Freedom

Cheryl Misak. "Pragmatism and the Transcendental Turn in Truth and Ethics," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXX, No. 4 (Fall 1994): 739-775.

Lewis Mumford. The Golden Day: A Study in American Experience and Culture. New York: Boni and Liveright, 1926.
      Questions ability to withdraw from culture to critique in Deweyan inquiry.[xxiii]

Thomas P. Neil. “Dewey’s Ambivalent Attitude Toward History,” in John Dewey: Critical Assessments Vol. IV: Nature, Knowledge and Naturalism. London and New York: Routledge, 1992.  Originally published in John Dewey: His Thought and Influence (Fordham University Press, 1960).
            Critiques Dewey’s “instrumental” view of history: past for present needs.

Thomas J. Nenon, ed.  Heidegger and Praxis: Spindel Conference 1989, The Southern Journal of Philosophy, Vol. XXVIII Supplement.  Memphis, Mississippi. Department of Philosophy, Memphis State University, 1990.

Reinhold Niebuhr. Moral Man and Immoral Society: A Study in Ethics and Politics. New York and London: C. Scribner's, 1932.
            Questions ability to withdraw from culture to critique in Deweyan inquiry.[xxiv]      

Friedrich Nietzsche. The Genealogy of Morals

Martha Nussbaum. The Fragility of Goodness

Gregory Fernando Pappas. "Dewey's Ethics: Morality as Experience" in Reading Dewey

Gregory Fernando Pappas, Dewey’s Ethics: Democracy as Experience. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2008.

Gregory Fernando Pappas. "Dewey’s Moral Theory: Experience as Method," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXXIII, No. 3 (Summer 1997): 520-556.

Gregory Fernando Pappas. "William James' Virtuous Believer" in Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXX, No. 1 (Spring 1994): 77-109.

Charles S. Pierce. The Essential Peirce, ed. Indiana UP, 1998.

Ruth Anna Putnam. "The Moral Impulse," The Revival of Pragmatism: New Essays on Social Thought, Law, and Culture. ? : ? , ? .

Phillip Reynolds. "John Dewey and Moral Science," in Pragmatism and Values, Vol. 1. ?: Rodopi, 2004.

Melvin Rogers. “Action and Inquiry in Dewey’s Philosophy,” The Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2007): 90-115.
            Defense of Dewey on over-reach of intelligence critique.
            Defends against West, Niebuhr, Diggins, Deneen, etc.

Melvin Rogers. The Undiscovered Dewey: Religion, Morality, and the Ethos of Democracy. ?: Columbia UP, 2008.

Richard Rorty. Contingency, Irony, Solidarity. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1989.
            Claims Dewey and Heidegger are doing roughly the same thing.

Richard Rorty.  Some Consequences of Pragmatism. ?: University of Minnesota Press, 1982.

Richard Roty.  Philosophy and Social Hope. ?: Penguin Books, 2000.

Sandra Rosenthal. “The Individual, the Community, and the Reconstruction of Values” in Philosophy and the Reconstruction of Culture: Pragmatic Essays after Dewey. ed. John Stuhr. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1993.

Frank X. Ryan. "The Kantian Ground of Dewey’s Functional Self," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXVIII, No. 1 (Winter 1992): 127-144.

George Santayana. "Dewey's Naturalistic Metaphyics," The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 22, No. 25 (Dec. 3, 1925): 673-688.
            Dewey (unnecessarily) restricts vision to the naturalistic context.

Charlene Haddock Seigfried. "Feminist Ethics and the Sociality of Dewey's Moral Theory" Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXXVI, No. 4 (Fall 2000): 529-534.

John Shook. Dewey's Empirical Theory of Knowledge and Reality. Vanderbuilt UP, 2000.
            Genealogical account of Dewey’s development, addresses social engineering.
            Critiques the “Dewey naturalized and functionalized Hegel via Darwin and James”            line of thought:Dewey was already well on his way due to his early studies of      Wilhelm Wundt and tutelage of G. Stanley Hall.

R.W. Sleeper. “What is Metaphysics?”
            Comparison of Dewey and Heidegger on metaphysics.

R.W. Sleeper.  The Necessity of Pragmatism. Champaign, University of Illinois Press, 2001.

Charles L. Stevenson. "Reflections on John Dewey's Ethics," Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Vol. 62 (1961-1962).
            Historic critique.

David Strand. "Is Meliorism a Live Option? Toward a Reconstruction and Defense of Socratic Faith," Journal of Speculative Philosophy Vol. 20, No. 2 (2006): 124-131.
            Claims pragmatism avoids Heideggerian “enframing.”

Scott Stroud. “Pragmatism and Orientation,” Journal of Speculative Philosophy, Vol. 20, No. 4 (2006): 287-307.

Scott Stroud. “Orientational Meliorism in Dewey and Dogen,” Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2007): 185-215.

John Stuhr, “The Idols of the Twilight,” Genealogical Pragmatism: Philosophy, Experience, and Community (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1997).

John Teehan. "Character, Integrity and Dewey’s Virtue Ethics," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. 31, No. 4 (Fall 1995): 841-863.

Charles A. Tesconi, Jr. & Van Cleve Morris. The Anti-Man Culture: Bureautechnocracy and the Schools. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1972.
            Deweyan thought allows for social control for bourgeois pliancy.[xxv]

H.S. Thayer. "Dewey and the Theory of Knowledge," Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXVI, No. 4 (Fall 1990): ?.

J.E. Tiles, Dewey (London & New York: Routledge, 1988).

Leroy F. Troutner. "The Confrontation Between Experimentalism and Existentialism--From Dewey through Heidegger and Beyond," Philosophy of Education 1968: Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Meeting of the Philosophy of Education Society, ed. George L. Newsome Jr. Edwardsville, Illinois: Studies in Philosophy and Education, Southern Illinois University, 1968. pp. ?.
            Dewey’s education theory must be thought through Heidegger.

Leroy Troutner. “The Dewey-Heidegger Comparison Re-visited: A Reply and Clarification,” Educational Theory Vol. 22, No. 2 (Spring 1972): 212-220.

Cornelis de Waal. "Eleven Challenges to the Pragmatic Theory of Truth" Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXXV, No. 4 (Fall 1999): 748-766.

Jennifer Welchman. "Dewey and McDowell on Naturalism, Values, and Second Nature," Journal of Speculative Philosophy, Vol. 22, No. 1 (2008): 50-58.
            Claims Dewey is a cognitivist on value, but then asserts primacy of “first nature” over “second nature” (habit over character).

Jennifer Welchman. "Dewey, Moore and the Science of Ethics" Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XXXIII, No. 2 (Spring 1997): 392-409.

Jennifer Welchman. The Development of John Dewey’s Moral Epistemology. Dissertation, Philosophy Dept., Johns Hopkins University, advisors J. B. Schneewind, Susan Wolf.

Jennifer Welchman. Dewey's Ethical Thought. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1995.

Jennifer Welchman. "William James's 'The Will to Believe' and the Ethics of Self-Experimentation" in Transactions of the C.S. Peirce Society, Vol. XLII, No. 2 (Spring 2006): 229-241.

Cornel West. The American Evasion of Philosophy: A Genealogy of Pragmatism. Wisconsin, University of Wisconsin Press, 1989.
            Dewey is hopelessly optimistic regarding inquiry.[xxvi]

Robert Westbrook. John Dewey and American Democracy. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1991.
            Response to critique that Deweyan thought advocates social engineering.[xxvii]

Morton White. "Value and Obligation in Dewey and Lewis,” Philosophical Review Vol. 58, No. 4 (July 1949): 321-330.
            Historic critique on Dewey and the is/ought distinction.

Morton White. “Desire and Desirability: A Rejoinder to a Posthumous Reply to John Dewey,” Journal of Philosophy Vol. 93, No. 5 (May 1996): 229-242.
            Against desired/desirable distinction in Dewey’s unpublished writings.[xxviii]

Bruce Wilshire. William James and Phenomenology: A Study of the Principles of Psychology. Bloomington, Indiana Univeristy Press, 1968.

Notes


[i]           From Robert Jacques: "Another scholar claims he had not sense that modern alienation derives from a loss of religion and can only be remedied by religion, not social action; and that his belief in intelligence disseminated throughout democracy by means of education renders undeniable the conclusion that 'Dewey did have an optimistic outlook' (Bernstein, 1966: 176) [from Jacques, 1991]
[ii]           From Melvin Rogers: “Raymond Boisvert adds to West’s mischaracterization when he suggests that “sensitivity to inherent natural limitations is decidedly underemphasized” in Dewey’s work.”
[iii]          From Eric MacGilvray: Bourne's central thesis, stated again and again, is that the use of war as a means of intelligent reconstruction is impossible: "War is just that absolute situation which is its own end and its own means." "Conscience and Intelligence in War" (1917), in John Dewey: The Political Writings, ed. Debra Morris and Ian Shapiro (Indianapolis: Hackett, 1993), 200. His diagnosis is not that pragmatism is incapable of projecting ends, as is commonly held, but rather that in war- time all ends are subordinated to those of war itself: war is "precisely the one situation in which [Dewey's] philosophy will no longer work." Ibid., 199, emphasis mine.
[iv]          From Melvin Rogers.
[v]           From Melvin Rogers.  See chaps. 1–2, 6.
[vi]          From James Good.
[vii]         From James Good.
[viii]         From Melvin Rogers.  See chaps. 5–7, especially at 299–305;
[ix]          From Melvin Rogers.  See chap. 2.
[x]           From James Good
[xi]          From Melvin Rogers
[xii]          From Robert Jacques: Claimed Dewey has no sense of irony, “paradox and tragedy,” alienation from disestablishment of traditional moral and spiritual authorities, has a “strongly optimistic view of the inherent harmony between mankind’s needs and the structure of the cosmos.”
[xiii]         Per James Good, there are many critiques of whether a Deweyan individual can withdraw from culture in order to critique it.  These are rooted in three concerns:
1.  overconfidence in prospects of self-sacrifice for social good
2.  doubt that instrumentalism can critically assess means and ends
3.  truth is a (passive) adaptation to the environment
[xiv] Historic response to White & Stevenson: Morton White, "Value and Obligation in Dewey and Lewis, Philosophical Review Vol. 58, No. 4 (July 1949): 321-330; Charles L. Stevenson, "Reflections on John Dewey's Ethics," Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Vol. 62 (1961-1962): ?.
[xv]         From James Good
[xvi]         From Eric MacGilvray, see Chap. 14.
[xvii]         From Robert Jacques
[xviii]        From James Good
[xix]         From Eric MacGilvray, See Chapter 5.
[xx]          From James Good
[xxi]         From James Good
[xxii]        From James Good.  See pp. 49-50; 300-301
[xxiii]       From James Good
[xxiv]       From James Good
[xxv]         From James Good
[xxvi]        See chap. 3, pp. 101-102.
[xxvii]        From James Good, Melvin Rogers.  See pp. 178-189.
[xxviii]       Specifically,        desirable=desired in normal conditions still has is/ought problems.

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